Category Archives: Economics of the Family

eMarriage

Andrew Norton’s recent post about Facebook* reminded me of something I noticed in the US: the complete acceptance of internet dating. Last month, we learned on two occasions of friends who have gotten married to people they met online (one on Match, … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 12 Comments

Go ask your older brother – he's the smart one

According to a new study using Norwegian data, older siblings are 3 IQ points smarter than their younger brothers. Older and Wiser?  Birth Order and IQ of Young Men  Sandra E. Black, Paul J. Devereux, Kjell G. Salvanes  While recent … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education, Economics of the Family | 6 Comments

Revealed preference versus stated preference

Joshua Gans reports on coverage of our paper on obstetrics conferences in the Oz. The amusing thing about the report is that although the obstetricians changed the time of their conference just after we showed them our paper, they still … Continue reading

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The formula for success?

Economists love technological explanations – for just about everything. Gender Roles and Technological Progress Stefania Albanesi & Claudia Olivetti Until the early decades of the 20th century, women spent more than 60% of their prime-age years either pregnant or nursing.  Since … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 19 Comments

Strange Days are These

Joshua Gans and I have written an article for the Melbourne Review (Melbourne Business School’s glossy magazine), summing up our half-dozen papers on unusual days in births and deaths. It’s received a bit of media coverage, which Joshua coyly posts.

Posted in Economics of the Family | 3 Comments

The economics of marriage and divorce

In his Economic Scene column in today’s New York Times, Tyler Cowen writes up the research agenda of Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers, two friends of mine who have penned a series of papers on the economics of marriage and … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 1 Comment

Baby Talk Reprised

I’ll be giving a seminar next Tuesday (April 3), on the topic “Are Weekend Births More Dangerous?”. Regular blog readers will recall this as the talk that I was going to give on March 6, but which I then rudely … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 2 Comments

Right-wingers for gay marriage

Andrew Norton has a terrific post on the tension between liberals and conservatives over the issue of gay marriage. Following up on a piece in the Oz by Tim Wilson, Andrew carefully unpicks the critique by gay marriage opponent John … Continue reading

Posted in Australian Politics, Economics of the Family | 5 Comments

Is marriage good for kids?

Arguing with Gary Becker about the economics of the family is a risky strategy at best, but when I read this: Virtually all studies show that children brought up in intact families do better at school, and have fewer drug … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 2 Comments

Baby Talk

I’ll be giving a seminar next Tuesday (March 6), on the topic “Are Weekend Births More Dangerous?”. It’ll run from 12.30-1.30pm, in seminar room D of the HC Coombs Building (map). There won’t be a paper, and the seminar will … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 2 Comments

Size matters

Ten days after our baby entered the world, the latest copy of the Quarterly Journal of Economics landed in my inbox. It includes a paper I hadn’t seen before – “From the Cradle to the Labor Market? The Effect of … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education, Economics of the Family | 6 Comments

Please welcome…

Well, it took a while, but our first child entered the world at 11.43am this morning. After some consideration of the options, we’ve named him Sebastian Leigh. At 4.4kg, he’s a good sized fella. Mum and bub are doing well. … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 32 Comments

Special Delivery

Our baby was due yesterday, and has not yet arrived. My head of department (who is also a mother of four) informed me with a smile that late arrival is positively correlated with bad teenage behaviour. On the other hand, missing … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 10 Comments

Baby Jihad

On the topic of baby names, commenter Russell draws my attention to a new list of popular names, this time from Western Australia. I couldn’t help noticing the fact that the boys’ list begins: Jack Thomas Incidentally, my wife and I have … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family, Law | 5 Comments

Something suddenly came up at the office

Now here’s a neat idea, nicely executed, with non-obvious results. And you can tell your friends about it over a dinner party. What more can you want from good social science research? Working Late: Do Workplace Sex Ratios Affect Partnership  … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 1 Comment

December's Child

Joshua Gans writes up a cute NYT article on birth patterns. In the US, child tax deductions aren’t pro-rata’ed. In other words, if you’re a parent anytime during the year, you can claim the child tax deduction. So there’s a big incentive … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 1 Comment

Trendy names?

My wife and I are expecting our first child in February, so we’ve begun scoping out names. Naturally, you want a euphonious name. It also helps the child’s name works with your last name – which in our case rules out: Sara, … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 47 Comments

A few less spring conferences

A quick update on the obstetrics conference paper. As you’ll recall, my paper with Elena and Joshua recommended that the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists move its conference from October (a high birth season) to … Continue reading

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What happens to births when obstetricians hold their annual conference?

Joshua Gans, Elena Varganova and I have a new paper out today. Minding the Shop: The Case of Obstetrics Conferences We estimate the impact of annual obstetricians and gynecologists’ conferences on births in Australia and the United States. In both … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 2 Comments

Speed Dating

When people talk about economics seeking to colonise the social sciences, this is the kind of paper they have in mind. Can Anyone be “The” One? Evidence on Mate Selection from Speed Dating Michèle Belot and Marco Francesconi Abstract: Marriage … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 7 Comments

Baby talk

Next Wednesday lunchtime, I’ll be presenting in the CRPSM lunchtime seminar series at the University of Canberra. Please come if you’re in the area. Date: Wed 29 Nov Time: 12:30-1:30pm Venue: Room 6c35, Building 6 (one floor up from the usual … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 13 Comments

Young Parent Forums

Daniel Donahoo, an OzProspect fellow, has been writing a lot about parenting over recent years. Now, he’s also doing some interesting activist work. NSW Young Parents Forum Series  OzProspect, in partnership with the NSW Department of Community Services and Copeland … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 1 Comment

An early inducement

According to today’s Sun Herald and Sunday Age, obstetricians are calling on Health Minister Tony Abbott to bring forward the Baby Bonus announcement from July 1 (next Saturday) to June 26 (tomorrow). As the Sun Herald put it: A leading … Continue reading

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Lunatic theories

Joshua Gans and I have been writing recently about a bunch of different things that affect the timing of births and deaths. The Millennium, weekends and inauspicious days, the abolition of inheritance taxes, and the introduction of a $3000 baby … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 3 Comments

Baby Bonuses and One-Child Policies

My Baby Bonus paper with Joshua Gans is written up in the People’s Daily. I may never again match this readership. I can’t help wondering what a country with a one-child policy makes of a baby bonus. Since I’ll be in … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 20 Comments

BB-Bounce

More Baby Bonus news: Oped in today’s Australian Snippet on NPR Peter Costello responding to our research in Question Time yesterday I will, I promise, post on other topics soon. If I’m starting to repeat myself, I blame it on … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 6 Comments

BB#3

In the wake of our Baby Bonus study, a mother who gave birth on 30 June 2004 just emailed me. Here’s her story. I was a private patient.  I spoke with my private ob, a public ob and private and … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 23 Comments

Born on the First of July

On 11 May 2004, Peter Costello brought down the budget in which he urged Australian families to have “one for mum, one for dad, and one for the country”. And because Treasurers can put their money where their mouth is, … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | 5 Comments

A heartbeat away

In today’s SMH, John Garnaut writes up my paper with Joshua Gans on Australia’s 1979 abolition of the inheritance tax (here’s Joshua’s take). Recall that we find that about 50 people – half of those who would have paid the … Continue reading

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Picking birthdays

Over at the Apila Econ Blog, Brandon Fuller has written up the paper on “Bargaining Over Labor” which I wrote with Joshua Gans. I’m embarassed to say it, but I think he did at least as good a job explaining it … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of the Family | Comments Off on Picking birthdays